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Long Buckby United Reformed Church

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“Left-Handed Billy” (from Robert Merry’s Museum, December 1850; pp. 174-175) There was once a boy whose name was William: but they used to call him Billy. He was a good-natured fellow, yet he had one fault—he chose to have his own way, and was never careful to mind his parents.... I must now tell you that Bill was naturally left-handed. By this I mean, that he was more apt to use his left hand than his right. If he took a knife to cut with, or a pen to write anything, he took it in his left hand. His mother used great care to break him of this fault, but still careless Bill kept on using his left hand instead of his right. Thus he adopted the habit of being left-handed, and he never got over it. This made him appear very awkward, and was a great trouble to him as long as he lived. Nor was this the only evil that flowed from his heedlessness: he grew up careless and awkward in everything. I must tell you one curious instance of this. One day he went up into a tree which stood before his father’s house, to saw off a large branch. Well, he got upon the branch, took the saw in his left hand and went to work. But alas! the poor fellow got upon the wrong part of the limb, and, when it fell, Left-handed Bill fell with it. He had sawed himself down! The boy was sadly bruised, and his mother told him she hoped it  would teach him the folly of being so careless. But bad habits, once adopted and confirmed, are hard to cure, and Bill went on as heedless as before. Thus he grew up, and, when he was a man, he received the title of Left-handed Billy. If he drove a team of cattle, he was sure to be on the wrong side. He never succeeded in anything, but became what is called an unlucky fellow. The people used to say, if there was a wrong side, Bill was sure to take it. Such were the evils of growing up in habits of carelessness...” Thankfully there have been many changes in the past 100 years when it comes to ascribing people’s morality to the predominant side of their brain! My father was probably naturally left-handed but was forced to use his “correct “ (right) hand –that was in the 1920’s and his hand-writing was always virtually illegible. Thirty years later I was never forced to change my preferred handedness. Once I moved into a manse with magnolia walls throughout. My carpet and curtains in the living/-dining room were a dusky pink. It was never a comfortable relaxing room to be in. A year later I decorated the walls with “white- with-a-hint-of pink” emulsion and suddenly the lounge felt harmonious and was a room to relax in. Magnolia may seem to be “neutral” but in some situations it’s yellow hue makes it far from neutral. One room’s comfort, may be another room’s discomfort. I grew up knowing that God loved what God had made and each of God’s children was unique and precious. Sometimes people can live an entire life-time trying to “conform” to a life pattern or career choice made by others and never quite feel at ease. This summer be mindful that you are not dismissing cabbage seedlings because they do not produce courgettes. Whether you are at home, on holiday or busy working, thank God for those you meet and enjoy their uniqueness. Shalom,  Elizabeth
© Long Buckby URC 2017
News 1

Long Buckby United Reformed Church

Email the Webmaster
“Left-Handed Billy” (from Robert Merry’s Museum, December 1850; pp. 174-175) There was once a boy whose name was William: but they used to call him Billy. He was a good-natured fellow, yet he had one fault—he chose to have his own way, and was never careful to mind his parents.... I must now tell you that Bill was naturally left-handed. By this I mean, that he was more apt to use his left hand than his right. If he took a knife to cut with, or a pen to write anything, he took it in his left hand. His mother used great care to break him of this fault, but still careless Bill kept on using his left hand instead of his right. Thus he adopted the habit of being left-handed, and he never got over it. This made him appear very awkward, and was a great trouble to him as long as he lived. Nor was this the only evil that flowed from his heedlessness: he grew up careless and awkward in everything. I must tell you one curious instance of this. One day he went up into a tree which stood before his father’s house, to saw off a large branch. Well, he got upon the branch, took the saw in his left hand and went to work. But alas! the poor fellow got upon the wrong part of the limb, and, when it fell, Left- handed Bill fell with it. He had sawed himself down! The boy was sadly bruised, and his mother told him she hoped it  would teach him the folly of being so careless. But bad habits, once adopted and confirmed, are hard to cure, and Bill went on as heedless as before. Thus he grew up, and, when he was a man, he received the title of Left-handed Billy. If he drove a team of cattle, he was sure to be on the wrong side. He never succeeded in anything, but became what is called an unlucky fellow. The people used to say, if there was a wrong side, Bill was sure to take it. Such were the evils of growing up in habits of carelessness...” Thankfully there have been many changes in the past 100 years when it comes to ascribing people’s morality to the predominant side of their brain! My father was probably naturally left-handed but was forced to use his “correct “ (right) hand –that was in the 1920’s and his hand-writing was always virtually illegible. Thirty years later I was never forced to change my preferred handedness. Once I moved into a manse with magnolia walls throughout. My carpet and curtains in the living/-dining room were a dusky pink. It was never a comfortable relaxing room to be in. A year later I decorated the walls with “white- with-a-hint-of pink” emulsion and suddenly the lounge felt harmonious and was a room to relax in. Magnolia may seem to be “neutral” but in some situations it’s yellow hue makes it far from neutral. One room’s comfort, may be another room’s discomfort. I grew up knowing that God loved what God had made and each of God’s children was unique and precious. Sometimes people can live an entire life-time trying to “conform” to a life pattern or career choice made by others and never quite feel at ease. This summer be mindful that you are not dismissing cabbage seedlings because they do not produce courgettes. Whether you are at home, on holiday or busy working, thank God for those you meet and enjoy their uniqueness. Shalom,  Elizabeth